New Harvest 2017 Conference, dedicated to Cellular Agriculture

EXPERIENCE THE NEWEST HARVEST OF CELL CULTURED PRODUCTS AT THE WORLD’S FIRST CONFERENCE DEDICATED TO CELLULAR AGRICULTURE.
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NYC

#NewHarvest2017

OCTOBER 11 & 12, 2017

#NewHarvest2017

EXPERIENCE CELLULAR AGRICULTURE

#NewHarvest2017

PIONEER WORKS

About

EXPLORE THE OPPORTUNITIES, CHALLENGES, AND REALITIES OF CELLULAR AGRICULTURE AT NEW HARVEST'S SECOND ANNUAL CONFERENCE.

  • 1

    What is Cellular agriculture?

    Cellular agriculture is the production of agricultural products like food (meat, milk, eggs); materials (leather, silk, bone); and more from cell cultures rather than whole plants or animals.

    Read More

  • 2

    Who is New Harvest?

    New Harvest is the non-profit research institute that is funding open science in cellular agriculture through the New Harvest Research Fellowship program at universities around the world.

    www.new-harvest.org

  • 3

    What Can I Expect?

    Join us for 2 full days of programming — including a “Cell Ag 101” — and experience the latest developments in this exciting new field. Compelling talks and interactive exhibitions will present cellular agriculture's applications to food, materials, and more in an accessible and interdisciplinary manner.

    See Who's Speaking

Location

Pioneer works

Location

159 Pioneer Street
Red Hook, Brooklyn

Hours

October 11th & 12th
9am—6pm

Speakers

Speaker

Jack Bobo

Jack Bobo serves as the Senior Vice President and Chief Communications Officer for Intrexon, a synthetic biology company developing revolutionary solutions to the world's most pressing problems--in food, energy and health. In 2015, he was named by Scientific American one of the 100 most influential people in biotechnology. He joined Intrexon from the U.S. Department of State where he worked for thirteen years as a senior advisor on global food policy, biotechnology and agricultural trade. He is an accomplished communicator, having delivered more than 300 speeches on the future of food, the role of science and technology in feeding the world and how to build consumer trust. Prior to his career at the U.S. Department of State, he was an attorney at Crowell & Moring LLP. He received a J.D., an M.S. in Environmental Science, a B.A. in psychology and chemistry and a B.S. in biology from Indiana University.

Speaker

David Kay

David Kay is the Head of Mission at Memphis Meats, a startup developing a way to make meat from animal cells without the need to feed, breed or slaughter actual animals. David leads the company’s efforts to mobilize its mission-based supporters at both a grassroots and institutional level, and helps develop and execute the company’s communication and business development strategies. Prior to joining Memphis Meats, David studied political science at Stanford University.

Speaker

Marianne Ellis

Dr Marianne Ellis, BEng, PhD, CEng, MIChemE, is a Senior Lecturer (associate professor) in Biochemical Engineering at the University of Bath, UK, and also Associate Dean (Learning & Teaching) in the Faculty of Engineering and Design.

 

Marianne graduated with a degree in Chemical and Bioprocess Engineering (BEng, Hon) from the Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of Bath in 2001, where she also completed her PhD and became a lecturer in 2005. Her research is focused on bioprocess design for tissue engineering, to scale up cell culture to enable high quality and affordable products. The two main applications are non-animal technologies (in vitro models for drug discovery, toxicology and bioartificial organs), and cellular agriculture, in particular cultured meat.

Speaker

Mike Lee

Mike Lee is the founder of Studio Industries, a food product design & innovation studio, and the Future Market, a futurist food lab that explores what our food system could look like in the year 2065 through pop-up experiences and conceptual product prototypes. Mike is also co-founder of Alpha Food Labs, an Innovation Lab for next-gen food startups and corporations building products that are better for by People, Planet, and Profit.

 

Mike’s experience in food design & innovation has covered a wide range over the past 10 years. Prior to Studio Industries & The Future Market, Mike led product development initiatives on the Innovation & New Ventures team at Chobani. At Chobani, Mike focused on building out the Greek Yogurt maker’s savory product platform (Chobani Meze) and drove the product design process from research, insights and ideation, to food, flavor and packaging development, and then finally to business planning and production.

 

Mike also founded the Studiofeast underground supperclub, a sister organization to Studio Industries. Studiofeast creates unique dining experiences that use food as a medium to design experiences that range from the artful, to the educational, to the hedonistic.

 

Mike is a frequent and influential speaker on food innovation and has been featured in numerous publications and conferences such as PSFK, SXSW, Seeds & Chips, EXPO 2015 Milano, Fancy Food Show, Bloomberg BusinessWeek, FastCo Exist, CNBC, Edible Brooklyn, Food Navigator, and more. He has spoken at and worked with companies such as Thermomix, Cargill Protein Group, Barilla, Baldor, PepsiCo, Virginia Dare, Coca-Cola, the Chobani Food Incubator, the James Beard Foundation, Google, Applegate, Chipotle, Batali+Bastianich Hospitality Group, Food+Tech Connect, AccelFoods, the National Turkey Federation, the USA Rice Federation, Puratos, and the Food+Tech Summit & Expo Mexico City and Buenos Aires.

 

Mike is the grandson and son of Chinese restaurant owners in Detroit and was raised in those kitchens and dining rooms. He was trained in Business at the University of Michigan and Design at the Parsons School of Design. He now lives in Brooklyn, NY.

Speaker

Ben Wurgaft

Ben Wurgaft is a writer, historian, ethnographer, and enthusiastic eater, who has been doing research in the world of cellular agriculture since 2013. He holds a Ph.D. in intellectual history from UC Berkeley, and was a postdoctoral fellow at the New School for Social Research, and a National Science Foundation postdoctoral fellow at MIT. He is now a Visiting Scholar in Anthropology at MIT, where he is completing a book on cultured meat, cellular agriculture, and the future of food.

Speaker

Jesse Wolff

Jesse started his career in PepsiCo and over the past 20 years, has held various hands-on and leadership roles within IFF. He is currently the Global Vice President of Technical Innovation for the Flavors group at IFF. In this role, Jesse is responsible for driving the global Innovation programs, designed to re-imagine the possibilities of taste both today and into the future. Jesse manages a global multicultural group of approx. 500 technical scientists and taste designers, developing taste experiences for a wide range of food and beverage products for both small scale start ups as well as large global multinational manufacturers.  One of the Innovation programs Jesse leads is the Re-Imagine Protein™ program. It is comprised of a team of chemists, chefs, food scientists and consumer researchers who are exploring the interactions of taste, texture and protein to deliver consumer desired great taste in the context of complex protein structures for the need of today and into the future.

Jesse has lived and worked in the US, Europe and Asia, leading teams of taste designers.He has led taste treks across Indian tea plantations and expeditions through the Tsukiji fish market in Japan. He has tasted silkworm pupae in Cambodia, blowfish in Japan, Monkeyhead (mushrooms) in Singapore and pickled crab in Peru - all in search of the ultimate taste experience! He holds a Bachelor of Engineering Sciences degree in chemical/biochemical engineering from the University of Western Ontario and a Bachelor of Arts degree in East Asian studies from the University of Toronto.

Speaker

Yuki Hanyu

Yuki Hanyu is an Oxford graduate with a PhD in Chemistry, and founder of the Shojinmeat Project and Integriculture Inc. During his PhD, Yuki worked in the field of nanofabrication, the study of manipulating atoms and molecules. The field spans surface science, organic chemistry and biochemistry.

After working as a post-doctoral research staff in Tohoku University for 2010-2012, Yuki worked as a research scientist for Systems Engineering Laboratory, Toshiba Research and Development Center for October 2012 - December 2014, developing battery-based electric energy storage systems as part of the public infrastructures team.

In 2015, Yuki founded Integriculture Inc., a registered company. The company aims to develop large-scale cell culture technology that ultimately leads to "in vitro meat."

Speaker

Danielle Gould

Danielle Gould is the founder of Food+Tech Connect, the site of record and world’s largest community for food tech and innovation, and co-founder and co-CEO of Alpha Food Labs, a food innovation lab. Since 2010, Danielle has been the leading voice for leveraging new technology, investment and business models to create a better food future. She is also a founding member of the Culinary Institute of America's Business Leadership Council and a member of the Google Innovation Lab For Food Experiences. Danielle was named one of Fast Companies' 'Most Creative People in Business' and one of Fortune and Food & Wine Magazines 'Most Innovative Women in Food.'

Speaker

Richard Fowler

Richard Fowler is from Te Puke, New Zealand, where he farms 600 hectares with his wife Amy and their 3 children. They produce grass fed milk and beef which they supply to farmer owned co-operatives. 

 

In 2016, Richard embarked on an agricultural scholarship through Nuffield New Zealand, which gave him the opportunity to look at the global food system. During his studies, Richard chose to focus in on what he calls "synthetic food." He has since produced a report entitled "Will It Have Legs? An Investigation Into Synthetic Food and the Implications for NZ Agriculture."

Speaker

Kate Krueger

Kate began working in cellular agriculture as an intern at Perfect Day Foods (formerly Muufri) developing strategies to make milk proteins. She has a background in protein biochemistry and cell biology, and completed her Ph.D. in May 2017.

 

While in graduate school, Kate created and instructed at Clones to Crystals, an 8-week undergraduate laboratory course covering the basics of cloning, protein purification, and crystallization trials. She also co-founded and ran Learn to Code, a data science bootcamp for women, teaching 50+ students the basics of data science and software development in Python. Her research focused on how insects use their immune systems to fight disease, particularly the biochemistry of thioester containing proteins (TEPs), a family of insect immune proteins. She has extensive research experience in biochemistry, structural biology, and cell biology.

 

Kate holds an M. Phil in Cell Biology from Yale University and an A. B. in Biochemistry from Mount Holyoke College, and is a proud native of Federal Way, Washington. She is can often be found hiking or brewing hard cider.

Speaker

Mark Post

Professor Mark Post first got involved in a Dutch government-funded programme investigating “in vitro meat” in 2008, when he was a professor of tissue engineering at the Eindhoven University of Technology. The programme had been initiated by Wilem van Eelen, an 86-year-old entrepreneur who held a long-time fascination for the possibility of culturing meat.

 

When the director of the programme fell ill, about mid-way through the programme, Post took over supervision of the PhD students. Motivated by the potentially high societal impact, he continued research even after the funding had ended in 2010.

 

Renewed funding by a private partner enabled the realisation of a project to create a processed meat product using muscle cells from a cow.

 

Professor Post received his medical degree from the University of Utrecht in 1982 and trained for a PhD in Pulmonary Pharmacology, graduating from the University of Utrecht in 1989.

 

He joined the KNAW Interuniversity Cardiology Institute of the Netherlands before being appointed full-time Assistant Professor in Medicine at Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA in 1996. Five years later, he moved with his lab to Dartmouth Medical School, Hanover, NH, and was appointed Associate Professor of Medicine and of Physiology.

 

In July 2002, Dr. Post returned to the Netherlands as a Professor of Vascular Physiology at Maastricht University and Professor of Angiogenesis in Tissue Engineering at the Technical University Eindhoven. Since January 2004 he has been Chair of Physiology and Vice Dean of Biomedical Technology at Maastricht University.

 

Mark is a co-founder and CSO of Mosa Meat.

Speaker

Kristin Ellis

Kristin Ellis leads scientific operations at Opentrons, a start-up making robots for biologists. She previously worked in scientific development and clinical trials for MD Anderson Cancer Center. Now her work is focused on making research more collaborative, reproducible, and accessible with open source lab robotics.
 
Aside from her work at Opentrons, Kristin is a member of the biohackerspace Genspace and an avid runner and reader. Her passions for open science, community projects, and creating opportunities for women in STEM have also motivated her to organize science hackathons in NYC and beyond.

Speaker

Illtud Dunsford

Illtud is a Farmer, Agri-Food Consultant and owner of Charcutier Ltd. Charcutier Ltd is a specialist meat processing business that derived from a farm diversification project. It supplies leading food halls such as Fortnum & Mason and Harrods and has been recognised by a number of awards, most notably as the Best Food Producer in the UK by the BBC Food and Farming Awards.

 

Illtud's consultancy work in the pig industry has led to collaborations with a number of academic institutions, most recently on feed trials with Harper Adams University and a DNA mapping study with IBERS, Aberystwyth University. Work in value-added meat production has involved securing EU Protected Food Name Status for Traditionally Reared Pedigree Welsh Pork TSG. He is Chair of Slow Food Cymru Wales and has worked with the Slow Food Foundation for Biodiversity to promote the Pedigree Welsh Pig breed across the the world. 

 

As a member of the WRAP Meat Working Group, Illtud is actively involved in reducing waste within the commercial meat industry and has recently worked with US philosopher Chef Dan Barber on the WastED London project. He is a board member for Hybu Cig Cymru, the red meat levy board for Wales and a board member for the Welsh Pig Project. He is a Nuffield Farming Scholar and his period of study led him to explore the possibilities of alternative proteins with a focus on cultured meat. Illtud is also a founding member of Cultivate, the UK forum for Cellular Agriculture and co-founder of biotech startup Cellular Agriculture Ltd.

Speaker

Kevin Chen

Kevin is the CEO and co-founder of Hyacinth Bio. Founded in 2014, Hyasynth is developing strains of yeast that have the ability to produce the active compounds of cannabis called cannabinoids. Despite the rapid growth of the medical cannabis industry, there is still limited access to products, and the quality and reliability of the current, plant-based supply chain is often poorly regulated. Patients, both young and old, need cannabinoid products that they can depend on. Hyasynth is creating a supply chain for cannabinoids that the industry can depend on, and more.

 

Aside from his work at Hyasynth, Kevin runs the community biology lab in Montreal called Bricobio, is a supporter and frequent judge at iGEM.

Speaker

Oron Catts

Oron Catts is the Director of SymbioticA, The Centre of Excellence in Biological Arts, School of Anatomy, Physiology and Human Biology, The University of Western Australia and a Professor at Large in Contestable Design at The Royal College of Arts, London.

 

He is an artist, designer, researcher and curator whose pioneering work with the Tissue Culture and Art Project which he established in 1996 is considered a leading biological art project. In 2000 he co-founded SymbioticA, an artistic research centre housed within the School of Anatomy, Physiology and Human Biology, The University of Western Australia. Under Catts’ leadership SymbioticA has gone on to win the Prix Ars Electronica Golden Nica in Hybrid Art (2007) the WA Premier Science Award (2008) and became a Centre for Excellence in 2008.

 

In 2009 Catts was recognised by Thames & Hudson’s “60 Innovators Shaping our Creative Future” book in the category “Beyond Design”, and by Icon Magazine (UK) as one of the top 20 Designers, “making the future and transforming the way we work.”

 

Catts interest is Life; more specifically the shifting relations and perceptions of life in the light of new knowledge and it applications. Often working in collaboration with other artists (mainly Dr. Ionat Zurr) and scientists, Catts have developed a body of work that speaks volumes about the need for new cultural articulation of evolving concepts of life.

 

Catts was a Research Fellow in Harvard Medical School, a visiting Scholar at the Department of Art and Art History, Stanford University, and a Visiting Professor of Design Interaction, Royal College of Arts, London. In 2012-2013 he set up a biological art lab called Biofilia - Base for Biological Art and Design, at the School of Art, Design and Architecture, Aalto University, Helsinki, where he was a Visiting Professor.

 

Catts’ ideas and projects reach beyond the confines of art; his work is often cited as inspiration to diverse areas such as new materials, textiles, design, architecture, ethics, fiction, and food.

 

Catts curated nine exhibitions, developed numerous artistic projects and performances. His work was exhibited and collected by museums such as MoMA NY, Mori art Museum, NGV, GoMA, Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, San Francisco, Ars Electronica, National Art Museum of China and more.

 

His work has been covered by The NY Times, Washington Post, Wired, New Scientist, Time, Newsweek and other TV, radio, print and online media.

Speaker

Rebecca White

Dr. Rebecca White is the Vice President of Operations for Qualitas Health, Inc., a Texas-based food and nutrition company with headquarters in Houston, Texas. At Qualitas, Dr. White oversees all production staff, ensures on spec production from several facilities and leads the company’s applied R&D and technical programs. Dr. White has almost 10 years’ experience in the algae industry, having previously held the title of Director of Cultivation at Sapphire Energy, Inc. At Sapphire, she advanced algae harvesting and cultivation efforts that successfully demonstrated the commercial viability of using algae to produce fuels and other high-value products.

 

Dr. White’s specialties include the application of traditional agriculture principles to the domestication of algae as a crop, the establishment of field testing and process monitoring facilities and protocols and public/educational outreach on algae in general. Dr. White received her Ph.D. in Microbiology from Texas A&M University, where she was an NSF Graduate Research Fellow. She currently serves on the Algae Foundation’s Algae Academy K-12 project committee, and on the Board of Directors for the Algae Biomass Organization.

Speaker

Lauri Reuter

Dr. Lauri Reuter is an expert in plant biotechnology with a research background in utilization of cultured plant cells as a production platform for recombinant proteins. Now, he is introducing plants to the field of cellular agriculture. His team has designed a bioreactor concept for growing plant cells for food – fresh at home. 

 

Lauri received his Master´s degree at Wageningen University in the Netherlands and his doctoral degree in the University of Helsinki in Finland. He is based as a Research Scientist at the Technical Research Centre of Finland. In addition to his research, Lauri is a passionate science communicator and gets easily excited about the past and future of food - on this planet and beyond.

Speaker

Lisa Dyson

Dr. Dyson is the CEO of Kiverdi, a hard science company with a mission to develop innovations that go beyond traditional agriculture to help feed and power the world by using natural microbes to convert CO2 into proteins and oils. Dr. Dyson’s technical background began with a PhD in physics from MIT and has included research in bioengineering, energy and physics at Stanford University, UC Berkeley, Princeton University, UC San Francisco, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories. Dr. Dyson was a Fulbright Scholar at the University of London, where she received a Master of Science degree, and has degrees in physics and mathematics from Brandeis University.

 

Dr. Dyson has broad business experience developing corporate strategies in a number of industries including in packaging, energy, automotive, chemicals, telecommunications, travel, and non-profits. While at The Boston Consulting Group, Dr. Dyson worked with executives at multi-national corporations to help them solve strategic business problems including cutting operational costs, expanding internationally, franchising, developing governance structures, designing effective organizations and developing market entry strategies. Dr. Dyson's entrepreneurial background began when she was on the founding team of an MIT start-up that received funding from Microsoft and later built and led a team that developed a technology that reached millions in volunteering campaigns.

 

Among her recent accolades, Dr. Dyson was honored this year by the San Francisco Business Times as “One of the Most Influential Women in the Bay Area” for a second year in a row and was given their “Forty Under 40” award for her leadership.

Speaker

Vince Sewalt

Vince Sewalt leads the Product Stewardship & Regulatory function for DuPont Industrial Biosciences in Palo Alto, CA. Vince focuses on creative ways to support innovation, foster product stewardship, drive advocacy for risk-based regulatory oversight while facilitating technology knowledge building and regulatory capacity building for emerging technologies and in emerging markets.

 

Vince is Chair of the Enzyme Technical Association (ETA) and is a BIO Board member. Noticeable advocacy contributions include the successful joint BIO/ETA petition to EPA for Tier 1 designation of Trichoderma reesei, ETA’s redirect of FDA/CVM to follow due process for establishing regulatory guidance impacting the renewable fuel ethanol industry, numerous presentations on safety & regulatory paradigms for microbial biotechnology to authorities in the US, Canada, Brazil, and China, as well as the NAS Biotechnology Committee on Future Products of Biotechnology and New Harvest. Most recently, Sewalt spoke at SB 7.0 about the future of Regulatory for SynBio. Sewalt is the lead author of the landmark enzyme GRAS review paper in ‘Industrial Biotechnology’ and has blogged for New Harvest.

Speaker

Mary Haderlein

Mary Haderlein is a leading new food and beverage strategist and is
the Principal of Hyde Park Group Food Innovation in Chicago.  For over
15 years, she has spearheaded new product efforts for a plethora of
international packaged food clients such as Quaker, Dole, Hormel and
Nestlé, as well as beverage initiatives for alcohol and spirits
clients including Constellation Brands and BeamSuntory.  She has
worked with many restaurant chains and food service clients like Olive
Garden, Wingstop, Starbucks and Fogo de Chao, to name a few.



Mary started Hyde Park Group Food Innovation in 2002 to help clients
develop stronger new product pipelines by connecting consumer insight
to culinary and design-driven food and beverage development.



The foundation of the company is Mary’s background in strategy,
research, and consumer marketing. After more than two decades working
with multi-national food clients at worldwide communication agencies
Omnicom, WPP and Saatchi, Mary started Hyde Park Group to help channel
top culinary and design talent into the new product stage-gate
process. Using a proprietary rapid proto-cepting approach, Mary helps
clients increase their new product potential while decreasing the
amount of time it takes to launch in market.



Mary is an ardent advocate of a cross-disciplinary approach to problem
solving. She takes great pride in surrounding herself with James
Beard-winning and Michelin-starred culinary chefs, top design talent,
and commercialization specialists to enlighten some of the most
pressing issues facing today’s food clients.



Hyde Park Group's demo kitchen, located in Chicago’s “foodie” West
Loop, serves as the company's hub for development and is used as a
workshop for chefs, food scientists, designers and clients to ideate,
create and experience possibilities.

Speaker

Natalie Rubio

A member of the New Harvest family since 2013, Natalie Rubio is currently a New Harvest Cultured Tissue Fellowship recipient at Tufts University in Boston. She is developing edible scaffolds for cultured meat with the David Kaplan Lab in the Department of Biomedical Engineering. With the support of New Harvest and its team of research fellows, Natalie is eager to help progress cultured meat products from the bench to the belly within a matter of years. While observing muscle cells under a microscope is her primary interest, she is also a true crime podcast fanatic and bagel aficionada.

Speaker

Marie Gibbons

Marie Gibbons is a New Harvest Research Fellow and​ ​Physiology graduate student at North Carolina State University. ​ ​She began her research in​ ​Cellular​ ​Agriculture in May of 2016 and is focusing on large-scale production methods for cultured poultry products. Other projects include serum-free media formulations and plant-based scaffolding experiments. In the fall of 2016, she produced the first cultured poultry meat, and in the spring of 2017, she created a turkey/jackfruit nugget hybrid. She is excited to be able to incorporate both her passion for animal welfare and science into her research towards creating sustainable, healthy, and humane meat!

MORE COMING SOON

Exhibitors

Exhibitor

Exxvivo

The Exxvivo team makes hardware for wet labs affordable, customizable, and accessible. We're inspired by the DIYbio movement and are dedicated to building an academic infrastructure around bioreactor design by fostering and mentoring student-led initiatives. Ultimately, our goal is to empower more people to get involved in science, biomanufacturing, and in vitro meat research

Exhibitor

Arctic Apples

Okanagan Specialty Fruits™ (OSF) is a dynamic agricultural biotechnology company specializing in developing tree fruit varieties with unique attributes. OSF’s flagship products are nonbrowning Arctic® apple varieties, with Arctic® Golden and Arctic® Granny apples being the first available for sale. Thanks to the Arctic Advantage™ benefit, Arctic® apples will not brown when bitten, sliced, or bruised.

Exhibitor

nonfood

Nonfood is building the future of food today, creating radically sustainable algae-based foods to drastically reduce agriculture's resource and carbon footprint. Nonfood’s first product, the Nonbar will be launching this Fall.

Exhibitor

Eat Cultured

Afineur develops smart cultures to naturally enhance food products and ingredients through tailored fermentations. Afineur launched its first consumer product through its sister brand, eatCultured.

 

Cultured Coffee is a healthier coffee that has been designed to be easier to digest and provide long lasting energy. 

Exhibitor

Biorealize

Biorealize is developing the next generation bioprototyping tools that allow users to design, test, iterate, and reproduce biological solutions at the bench, in the kitchen, or on the field. Our first product, Microbial Design Studio, is geared towards creating novel applications in probiotics, fermentation products, food and flavor design using synthetic biology or microbiome approaches.

Exhibitor

The Future Market

The Future Market is a conceptual grocery store that explores how we will produce and shop for the food over the next 25 years, to help food companies innovate more ambitiously today. Our goal is to envision what the food of tomorrow will look like today, through concept food products and experiences. We believe that to create better food for today, we have to think more ambitiously about tomorrow. The visions of the future that we create are all designed to stimulate and inspire the food industry into making products and services for today that are better for people, planet, and profit.

 

The Future Market is the brainchild of Studio Industries, a food design and innovation agency and Alpha Food Labs, both based in New York City.

Exhibitor

Algama

ALGAMA aims to develop a sector of the future: micro-algae, a unique and sustainable superfood. 


Drawing on culinary savoir-faire and biotech, we create healthy and great-tasting everyday foods for all. 

Exhibitor

Geltor

Geltor Inc. designs, makes and develops customizable protein products. We combine machine learning, synthetic biology, fermentation and materials science to create functionally-superior and sustainably-made protein-based materials. Our first product is tunable collagen, a valuable biomaterial ($3+B global market). The growing demand for animal-free collagen products is driven by the inconsistency of animal-derived materials, the inability to tune their properties, and changing consumer preferences. Further, the rapidly increasing demand for collagen-based products in certain markets has unmasked the need for a sustainable and scalable collagen manufacturing platform. We are launching collagen-based products in the R&D, cosmetics & personal care, and food & beverage markets which solve these pain points for businesses and consumers.

Exhibitor

Finless Foods

Finless Foods is a San Francisco-based cellular agriculture startup founded in 2017. Its mission is to develop and mass manufacture pioneering marine animal food products for human consumption. Using cellular agriculture methods, Finless Foods aims to prevent the environmental devastation currently caused by industrial fishing and aquaculture. They hope to create a kinder, more efficient, and more sustainable food system for everybody.

Exhibitor

Shojinmeat Project

The Shojinmeat Project is an interdisciplinary, open-source citizen science project aimed at the development of cultured meat in Japan. The project consists of a number of volunteers working in a variety of "clusters" in both scientific and non-scientific subject areas, in order to establish cellular agriculture as a discipline. Additionally, the Shojinmeat Project launched the startup Integriculture Inc.

Exhibitor

Spira

Spira tackles the problem of inefficient supply chain in our current food systems with effortless, cost-effective, and easy to implement microalgae systems that are sterile and optimize production. We've created novel processing and engineering techniques to showcase the potential of nutritional algae to enable personalized nutrition and customized taste. Spira is the enabling technology for the next green wave, an algae revolution. 

Cultured meat is a wonderful solution to many of the problems of animal agriculture but still faces some challenges of its own. One of the biggest challenges is the lack of a sustainable feedstock to supply the cells. Currently, the source of nutrients for cultured meat comes from serum derived from fetal tissue. Spira's research looks into a theoretical approach of modifying microalgae as a means of producing the serum necessary to make cultured meat grow. In addition, this exhibit will present the prototype of a home photobioreactor system as well as imagine a variety of food products that can be produced in this future kitchen appliance.

Exhibitor

Opentrons

Today, biologists spend too much time pipetting by hand. Opentrons thinks biologists should have robots to do pipetting for them. People doing science should be free of tedious benchwork and repetitive stress injuries. They should be able to spend their time designing experiments and analyzing data.

Opentrons makes robots for biologists. Their mission is to provide the scientific community with a common platform to easily share protocols and reproduce each other's results. Opentrons robots automate experiments that would otherwise be done by hand, allowing our community to spend more time pursuing answers to some of the 21st century’s most important questions.

Exhibitor

Common Garden

Common Garden is an IoT platform for automating and collecting data from controlled environments. We provide growers and researchers integrated hardware modules to experiment in more cost-effective ways.

Exhibitor

Mokshagundam Biotechnologies

Mokshagundaram Technologies' objective was to develop a cellular enhanced complete protein which does not require intensive resources, would be practical “in the field”, and could serve as a base in which other proteins such as myoglobin, actin, myosin, etc. could be expressed to simulate the taste of meat.

 

Their team expressed proteins in various single celled organisms and, utilizing proprietary techniques, drastically decreased post-expression processing to create a protein base. They were able to successfully develop an inexpensive, complete protein base consisting of cellular components and extrusion products. This base is low in methionine with resultant attenuation in IGF-1 signaling creating potential anti-aging and oncologic applications as well. A culinary process was refined by which this product can be incorporated into various regional foods (pasta, tortillas, etc.) which are inexpensive and highly palatable.

Exhibitor

Genspace

Genspace is the world’s first community lab—a place where anyone can learn and work on biotechnology. Since 2009, we have served the greater New York area by providing STEM educational outreach, classes for adults, cultural events, and a platform for science innovation at the grassroots level. 

Exhibitor

Jacy Reese

Jacy Reese researches the most effective strategies to expand humanity's moral circle as Research Director at the nonprofit think tank Sentience Institute. He's currently writing a book on The End of Animal Farming (Beacon Press 2018), which illuminates humanity's transition to an animal-free food system.

 

Jacy's research integrates evidence from historical social movements, psychology, and marketing. He will present on some of the research findings of his book, tackling strategic questions like: Is media attention good or bad for the cell ag community? Should cell ag foods be promoted more as an alternative for curious and ethics-focused consumers, or as the food of the future for everyone? What terminology should we use to refer to these foods?

Exhibitor

Kevin Yuen

Kevin Yuen, a recent graduate design fellow from MIT, explores new opportunities in open innovation and industry-wide collaborations in cellular agriculture. He started his career at Innosight, a consultancy founded by Clayton Christensen, advising Fortune 50 companies on disruptive innovation principles and growth strategies. In 2016, he was selected as an IDEO fellow at Food+Future, a collaborative incubator with the MIT Media Lab to prototype new ventures addressing food access & transparency. 

Exhibitor

Hanna Tuomisto

Dr. Hanna Tuomisto is a senior researcher at the University of Helsinki, Finland. She is interested in researching the interaction between environmental changes and food systems, and especially how novel food technologies could contribute to the sustainability of food systems in the future. Hanna holds a master's degree in agroecology from the University of Helsinki and a PhD degree from the University of Oxford. Before her current post, she worked as a postdoctoral researcher at the European Commission’s Joint Research Centre and at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine.

 

Food systems, especially livestock production, are major contributors to environmental stressors, such as climate change, land use change, loss of biodiversity, nutrient enrichment of waterways and water depletion. Due to global population growth and increased consumption of animal source foods, the environmental impacts have been predicted to dramatically exceed the safe planetary boundaries unless serious mitigation actions will be implemented. The possibilities to reduce the environmental impacts of conventional livestock production are limited, and therefore, more radical changes in the food production technologies are required. Due to the closed and controlled production conditions, cellular agriculture could have potential to produce food with drastically lower environmental burden than conventional agriculture. 

 

Hanna's poster presents the current knowledge of the environmental impacts of some products from cellular agriculture. The current estimates show that cellular agriculture can have lower greenhouse gas emissions, land use and water use, but often has a higher energy use requirement when compared to conventionally produced animal source foods. However, as most of the products of cellular agriculture are still at the development stage, more accurate environmental impact assessments can be carried out only once large-scale production facilities have been implemented.

Exhibitor

Bianca Datta

Bianca Datta is a PhD student at the MIT Media Lab studying materials (both how we can leverage them for technology and how we perceive them). She is part of the Object-Based Media group, in which she investigates how to create and transform interactive displays and interfaces. She is now exploring responsive, living material systems and biomaterials. Through her research, she hopes to build new materials and understand how dynamic or responsive technologies can promote wellbeing and sustainability. 

 

The Living Material Library presented here is an exploration the complex relationship between dynamic materials and living systems. Our work explores the ways in which intrinsic material properties may be functionally changed through environmental factors and, in turn, serve as dynamic substrates for living systems. We propose a reversible material system that allows for control of living interactions (much like a light switch). We are particularly interested in fluid material systems (such as electrorheological fluids) that transition from a liquid-like to a solid-like state when exposed to electric fields and currents. While other methods of cell intervention often rely on light, chemicals, or temperature, here we explore substrate material properties as inputs for organisms.  Our library may allow for more directed inquiry into specific cell processes. This project is a joint effort with Sunanda Sharma of the MIT Media Lab.

 

In her spare time, Bianca develops and organizes programs for graduate women, and mentors students in undergraduate living communities as a Graduate Resident Tutor and as a mentor for Minds Matter Boston.  She is an advocate for science communication, and spent this summer working as a journalist at NOVA (PBS).

Exhibitor

Jess Krieger

Jess Krieger is a biomedical sciences PhD student at Kent State University and New Harvest research fellow.  She decided to pursue cultured meat research after learning in her undergrad about the environmental consequences and animal welfare issues surrounding the animal agriculture industry. Her work aims to improve the similarity of in vitro meat to meat from livestock. Jess uses a skeletal muscle tissue engineering strategy to culture pork, with major focuses on muscle fiber formation, vascularization, and bioreactor design for scale up of meat production. 

 

Jess became a New Harvest Fellow in 2016 and her project was subsequently funded in 2017. She has received additional awards from Kent State University and the Shuttleworth Foundation to represent New Harvest in its visiting scholars program as part of an international collaboration to grow in vitro meat in plant-based scaffolds at Dr. Andrew Pelling’s lab at the University of Ottawa. Jess has presented her in vitro meat research at conferences and universities across North America and Europe and recently gave a TEDx talk on the subject at her home university. In her spare time Jess works to support and empower women in the sciences through her involvement with the Scientista Foundation. 

Exhibitor

Marie Gibbons

Jackfruit is a widely used meat substitute that mimics animal meats in texture and appearance, and has recently shown to be a promising scaffold for "clean" meat production. MG1 turkey muscle cells are successfully able proliferate, differentiate, and fuse into myotubes when attached to both decellularized and intact jackfruit fibers. Using the presented protocol, one can create a cultured meat/plant hybrid nugget with the meat-like appearance and texture of jackfruit combined with poultry protein and flavor provided by turkey muscle cells.

Exhibitor

Viktor Maciag

Viktor Maciag is a recent graduate from Tufts University with a degree in Biomedical Engineering. There he worked in the Kaplan lab, originally with the Neural Group working to create a scaffold for a model of a three-dimensional interconnected neuronal network grown from human induced pluripotent stem cells. Viktor then applied his cell culture and model experience to create an edible and safe scaffold to support the growth of avian muscle tissue for his Senior Capstone Research Project. Viktor worked with New Harvest Research Fellow Natalie Rubio and characterized and evaluated a chitosan based scaffold for turkey myoblast attachment, development, and growth. 

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Agenda

Day 1: October 11, 2017

Time Event Speaker
9:30AM–10:00AM Registration

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10:00–10:15AM Welcome Remarks

Kristin Ellis

Isha Datar

10:15–10:30AM The Elements of Cultured Meat: Cells 101

Marie Gibbons

10:30–10:45AM The Elements of Cultured Meat: Scaffolds 101

Natalie Rubio

10:45–11:00AM The Elements of Cultured Meat: Medium 101

Kate Krueger

11:00–11:15AM The Elements of Cultured Meat: Bioreactors 101

Marianne Ellis

11:15–11:45AM The Elements of Cultured Meat Panel Q&A

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11:45–1:30PM LUNCH

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1:30–2:00PM How Meat Became Technology

Ben Wurgaft

2:00–2:30PM NoBodies’ Food

Oron Catts

2:30–3:00PM BREAK

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3:00–4:00PM The Past, Present, and Future of Meat

Illtud Dunsford

Richard Fowler

Mark Post

David Kay

Moderator: Danielle Gould

4:00–4:30PM Citizen Science for Cellular Agriculture

Yuki Hanyu

4:30–6:00PM Happy Hour!

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Day 2: October 12, 2017

Time Event Speaker
9:30–10:00AM Registration

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10:00–10:30AM The Flavourful Future of Food

Jesse Wolff

10:30–11:00AM How Will Cellular Agriculture Be Regulated?

Isha Datar

Vince Sewalt

11:00–11:30AM BREAK

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11:30–12:00PM The Psychology of Science Communication

Jack Bobo

12:00–12:30PM Getting Cellular Agriculture Into the Real World

Mary Haderlein

Mike Lee

moderated by Isha

12:30–2:00PM LUNCH

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2:00–2:30PM Cellular Agriculture’s Green Machine: Algae

Rebecca White

2:30–3:00PM Plant Cells, Not Seeds

Lauri Reuter

3:00–3:30 PM BREAK

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3:30–4:00PM Catching the Cannabis Wave with Cellular Agriculture

Kevin Chen

4:00–4:30PM Recycling Carbon for Food with Space Age Cells

Lisa Dyson

4:30–5:00PM Closing Remarks

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Sponsors

New Harvest would like to thank all of its sponsors for their generous donations, and for making this event possible.

  • Soylent

  • KIND

  • ONEHOPE Winery

  • Pioneer Works

  • Thought For Food

  • Stray Dog Capital

  • The Shuttleworth Foundation

  • Lagunitas